Friday, 27 November 2020

27 November, 1596 - A Toy to Please Chaste Ladies and a short hiatus

Here's what the Admiral's Men performed at the Rose playhouse on this day, 424 years ago...

Henslowe writes: ye 27 of novmbȝ 1596 ... R at the toye ... xjs 

In modern English: 27th November, 1596 ... Received at The Toy ... 11 shillings

Two Women at a Window by Murillo (1655-60)
Today, the Admiral's Men returned to A Toy to Please Chaste Ladies, an enigmatic lost play; you can read more about it in the entry for 14 November, 1595.

The Toy continues to return very poor box office, as is so often the case. 

A short hiatus


There will be no blog entries for a few days, for reasons unknown. For the rest of December, Henslowe's Diary becomes rather spotty, with the Rose apparently silent on occasional days. We don't know the reason for this, but Henslowe's Diary ... as a Blog! will return on December 2 for a week that will include a new play - see you then!


Henslowe links



Comments?


Did I make a mistake? Do you have a question? Have you anything to add? Please post a comment below!

Thursday, 26 November 2020

26 November, 1596 - The Seven Days of the Week

Here's what the Admiral's Men performed at the Rose playhouse on this day, 424 years ago...

Henslowe writes: ye 26 of novmbȝ  1596 ... R at weake ... xvij  
In modern English: 26th November, 1596 ... Received at Week ... 17 shillings

Today, the Admiral's Men revived their enigmatic lost play The Seven Days of the Week, about which we know nothing beyond its title. Perhaps it was an anthology of seven short plays, or perhaps it was about the creation of the world. You can read more about it in the entry for 3rd June, 1595.


19th-century Italian bracelet illustrating each of the seven days of
the week with a portrait of the deity associated with it.
From the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore

The players keep reviving The Seven Days of the Week, but it continues to disappoint, with another mediocre audience today. 


Henslowe links



Comments?


Did I make a mistake? Do you have a question? Have you anything to add? Please post a comment below!

Wednesday, 25 November 2020

25 November, 1596 - Long Meg of Westminster

Here's what the Admiral's Men performed at the Rose playhouse on this day, 424 years ago...
Henslowe writes: ye 25 of novmbȝ 1596 ... R at longe meage ... xjs

In modern English: 25th November, 1596 ... Received at Long Meg ... 11 shillings
Long Meg, from
a 1750 edition
of the jest-book
Welcome back! After a mysterious hiatus, the Admiral's Men are back at the Rose to entertain London once more. Today, they have returned to Long Meg of Westminster, their play about the Amazonian warrior woman of London legend. You can read more about this play in the entry for 14 February, 1595.

There has been no nostalgia for the Admiral's Men during their brief absence, however: Long Meg has received a very small audience.  The company desperately needs to excite its audience with some new plays. 

Henslowe links



Comments?


Did I make a mistake? Do you have a question? Have you anything to add? Please post a comment below!


Sunday, 15 November 2020

15 November, 1596 - The Seven Days of the Week and a mysterious hiatus

Here's what the Admiral's Men performed at the Rose playhouse on this day, 424 years ago...

Henslowe writes: ye 15 of novmbȝ  1596 ... R at the vij dayes ... xij  
In modern English: 15th November, 1596 ... Received at The Seven Days ... 12 shillings

Today, the Admiral's Men revived their enigmatic lost play The Seven Days of the Week, about which we know nothing beyond its title. Perhaps it was an anthology of seven short plays, or perhaps it was about the creation of the world. You can read more about it in the entry for 3rd June.


19th-century Italian bracelet illustrating each of the seven days of
the week with a portrait of the deity associated with it.
From the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore

The players have rushed The Seven Days of the Week back to the stage after its successful revival a few days ago. But this seems to be to soon, as only a tiny audience has arrived to see it again. 


A mysterious hiatus



There will be no blog entries for the next ten days, as Henslowe records no performances between the 16th and 24th November. We do not know the reasons for this hiatus, although it is interesting to see that when the players return, they will introduce several new plays to the repertory. Perhaps they have realized that their plays are getting stale, and have decided to take the risk of shutting things down in order to focus on line-learning and other preparations.

Whatever the reasons, Henslowe's Diary ... as a Blog! will return on the 25th - see you then!


Henslowe links



Comments?


Did I make a mistake? Do you have a question? Have you anything to add? Please post a comment below!

Friday, 13 November 2020

13 November, 1596 - Tamar Cam

Here's what the Admiral's Men performed at the Rose playhouse on this day, 424 years ago...
Henslowe writes: ye 13 of novmbȝ 1596 ... R at  tambercame ... xvijs
In modern English: 13th November, 1596 ... Received at Tamar Cam ... 17 shillings

Today, for the last time that we know of, the Admiral's Men revived Tamar Cam, a lost play that told of war and wizardry during the exploits of the Mongol conqueror Hulagu Khan; you can read more about it in the entry for 28th April 1592.

The two Tamar Cam plays have been around for a long time; we first encountered them four years ago in 1592, at the premiere of the sequel premiered, but the original already existed. We saw that they may have been created to replicate the popular Tamburlaine plays by Christopher Marlowe. At the end of 1594, the company seems to have acquired the right to revive Tamburlaine itself,  and Tamar Cam was thus set aside. But the revival of Tamburlaine wasn't very successful either. Back in May of this year; the company returned to Tamar Cam again, but that revival too didn't do very well.

One cannot help but suspect that plays about Mongol conquerors are now considered old hat by the audience, and the company has thus decided to bid farewell to Tamar Cam. However, the plays have not gone for good; in 1602, it will be performed by another company at the Fortune playhouse in north London.

Persian illustration of Hulagu Khan (the likely inspiration for Tamar Cam) and his Christian wife


What's next?


There will be no blog entry tomorrow because November 14 was  Sunday in 1596 and the players did not petform. Henslowe's Diary ... as a Blog! will thus return on the 15th for what will turn to be a mysteriously curtailed week. See you then!


Henslowe links



Comments?


Did I make a mistake? Do you have a question? Have you anything to add? Please post a comment below!

Thursday, 12 November 2020

12 November, 1596 - The Blind Beggar of Alexandria

Here's what the Admiral's Men performed at the Rose playhouse on this day, 424 years ago...

Henslowe writes: ye 12 of novmbȝ 1596 ... R at the beager ... xvjs

In modern English: 12th November, 1596 ... Received at The Beggar ... 16 shillings

Beggars in Alexandria; an undated photograph
from Brooklyn Museum's Lantern Slide Collection
Today, the Admiral's Men revived The Blind Beggar of Alexandria, a comedy by George Chapman about a master of disguise. You can read more about this play in the entry for 12 February.

The company has rushed The Blind Beggar back after just a few days. But although this play is often been a lot more successful than other plays in the repertory, today's performance is disappointing. This winter season at the Rose looks set to be a lean one.


Henslowe links



Comments?


Did I make a mistake? Do you have a question? Have you anything to add? Please post a comment below!

Wednesday, 11 November 2020

11 November, 1596 - The Seven Days of the Week

Here's what the Admiral's Men performed at the Rose playhouse on this day, 424 years ago...

Henslowe writes: ye 11 of novmbȝ  1596 ... R at the vij dayes ... xxxv  
In modern English: 11th November, 1596 ... Received at The Seven Days ... 35 shillings

Today, the Admiral's Men revived their enigmatic lost play The Seven Days of the Week. We know nothing about this play beyond its title; perhaps it was an anthology of seven short plays, or perhaps it was about the creation of the world. You can read more about it in the entry for 3rd June, 1595


19th-century Italian bracelet illustrating each of the seven days of
the week with a portrait of the deity associated with it.
From the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore

This is a surprise return for The Seven Days of the Week, which has not been seen at the Rose for almost a year. The play, which used to be one of the company's most frequently performed, had gradually faded in popularity by December last year and was replaced it with a sequel which did not do as well. The company is now reviving the original again, in the hopes that Londoners may have been missing it. 

today's box office is quite good compared to what we have seen in the last few days; The Seven Days of the Week may still have the ability to draw a crowd.


Henslowe links



Comments?


Did I make a mistake? Do you have a question? Have you anything to add? Please post a comment below!